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From Freedom’s Shadow

African Americans & the U.S. Capitol The cruel irony of this nation’s founding and the U.S. Capitol is that both were made possible by the enslavement of African Americans.

We the People Program

Enhancing Civics Teaching & Learning The We the People Constitution Program engages thousands of students with an exploration of how the U.S. Constitution is alive in Washington, DC.

U.S. Capitol Historical Society
U.S. Capitol Historical Society20 hours ago
#OnThisDay in #history, 1947, “The Hollywood Ten” were blacklisted by #LosAngeles movie studios. The decision came one day after the House voted 346-17 to hold the writers, producers, and directors in contempt of #Congress for refusing to cooperate in its hearings on communists in #Hollywood.

Following World War II, the #USA turned its attention from the threat of fascism to the threat of communism. During this epoch, Americans’ fear of a subversive communist influence grew to extreme paranoia, what is now known as the “Red Scare.” While no industry was exempt, Hollywood faced amid the greatest scrutiny because of its films’ impact on American values and culture.

Spearheading this effort was the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), which sought to “protect the form of government guaranteed by the Constitution.” In doing so, however, the Committee also perpetuated a culture that threatened the rights guaranteed by the Constitution—like freedom of speech and assembly.

In October 1947, about 40 Hollywood figures were subpoenaed by HUAC to answer its central question: “Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?” Among those who cooperated were Walt Disney and President of the Screen Actors Guild, Ronald Reagan.

Eleven current or former Communist Party members, however, refused to answer Committee questions on First Amendment principles. Though one ultimately demurred before leaving the country, 10 did not, leading to their being found guilty of contempt of Congress, after which they were each fired or suspended, fined $1,000, and sentenced to up to one year in prison.

But “Is the accuser always holy now?” John Proctor protested in “The Crucible,” a 1953 allegory play about the Salem Witch Trials, which resulted in his hanging. “We are what we always were in Salem, but now the little crazy children are jangling the keys of the kingdom, and common vengeance writes the law!”
#OTD in #history, 1947, “The Hollywood Ten” were blacklisted by #LosAngeles movie studios. The decision came a day after the House voted 346-17 to hold the writers, producers, & directors in contempt of #Congress for refusing to cooperate in its hearings on #Hollywood communists. https://t.co/XnxjLsf9os CapitolHistory photo

#OnThisDay in #history, 1947, “The Hollywood Ten” were blacklisted by #LosAngeles movie studios. The decision came one day after the House voted 346-17 to hold the writers, producers, and directors in contempt of #Congress for refusing to cooperate in its hearings on communists in #Hollywood. Following World War II, the #USA turned its attention from the threat of fascism to the threat of communism. During this epoch, Americans’ fear of a subversive communist influence grew to extreme paranoia, what is now known as the “Red Scare.” While no industry was exempt, Hollywood faced amid the greatest scrutiny because of its films’ impact on American values and culture. Spearheading this effort was the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), which sought to “protect the form of government guaranteed by the Constitution.” In doing so, however, the Committee also perpetuated a culture that threatened the rights guaranteed by the Constitution—like freedom of speech and assembly. In October 1947, about 40 Hollywood figures were subpoenaed by HUAC to answer its central question: “Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?” Among those who cooperated were Walt Disney and President of the Screen Actors Guild, Ronald Reagan. Eleven current or former Communist Party members, however, refused to answer Committee questions on First Amendment principles. Though one ultimately demurred before leaving the country, 10 did not, leading to their being found guilty of contempt of Congress, after which they were each fired or suspended, fined $1,000, and sentenced to up to one year in prison. But “Is the accuser always holy now?” John Proctor protested in “The Crucible,” a 1953 allegory play about the Salem Witch Trials, which resulted in his hanging. “We are what we always were in Salem, but now the little crazy children are jangling the keys of the kingdom, and common vengeance writes the law!”

20 hours ago

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